Beats’ Powerbeats Pro headphones certainly bring the bass, which is why we’ve picked them for this category. Admittedly, all that low-end may lead to a little too much thump for some ears, and will be especially notable in tunes that don’t really need such booming sound. That said, if you’re familiar at all with Beats’ other bass blasters, like the Powerbeats3, you’ll be pleased to hear that the harmonic distortion from all that rumble is much less of an issue when listening on the Powerbeats Pro.
Communication headsets are used for two-way communication and typically consist of a headphone and attached microphone. Such headsets are used in a variety of professions as aviation, military, sports, music, and many service-oriented sectors. They come in all shapes and sizes, depending on use, required noise attenuation, and fidelity of communication needed.
If the damage is done there’s nothing that can currently undo it. On the bright side, you can learn more about how hearing loss occurs by reading our explainer piece. You can still take care of your remaining hearing by limiting volume levels to 85dB. That’s the recommended limit for safe-listening, and because earbuds are much closer to your ears than the speakers at a concert it’s even more important to keep that limit in mind.
Technically speaking, earbuds are not earphones, as they don't enter your ear canal. Instead they sit just outside of it, where it's easy to become loose and cause problems when it comes to accurate stereo imaging (in which both ears get the same amount of audio) and bass response. Earphones, meanwhile, fit in the ear canal and form a seal inside your ear, blocking outside noise while piping sound directly into your ears. They're much smaller and lighter than headphones, since they don't need to fit on or over your ears and don't require any outside support (though some have stiff wire sections or flexible fins to keep them in place without getting in the way). Plus they won't mess up your hair.

JLab's affordable, wireless sport buds also offer great value for the money. They have a very comfortable over-ear clip and Cloud Foam tips, and are IP66 rated. (I ran in the rain with these with no problem.) They have a crisp, clear Bluetooth 5.0 connection and decent 6-hour battery life. I can wear these for up to two weeks of working out without having to recharge the case, which also has its own convenient included charging cable. As is typical with JLab's workout buds, the signature EQ is bass-heavy and upper ranges can sometimes sound a little frizzy. But as I'm running or hiking, I sometimes forget I'm even wearing them.


If you’re looking for a more traditional pair of earbuds but at a lower price, Maxrock made these earbuds specifically for those trying to get to sleep. They provide some passive noise cancellation with the well-made silicone inserts that leave very little protruding from your ear, making it easier to sleep on your side without feeling uncomfortable. The sound quality isn’t the best around, but the comfort level and affordability make these earbuds well worth it.
Unfortunately, we as humans don’t hear perfectly. The typical human range of hearing is 20Hz-20kHz. Depending on your age or how often you’ve been subjected to loud noises (like going to concerts), you might not be able to hear everything in that range. There really isn’t any way to avoid this as we’re surrounded by loud noises and are aging by the minute, but you can prevent the worst of it.
This is, understandably, a concern of many potential true wireless users. Allow us to allay your fears—we can say that after over a year of testing, you have to try pretty hard to lose one earpiece. First off, just about every pair we've tested offers an extremely secure in-ear fit without sacrificing comfort. Most of the earpieces are larger than typical in-ears, while still maintaining a lightweight feel, making the likelihood of losing one while exercising (or at any other time) fairly low.
Noise-cancelling — Increasingly popular, especially among commuters and frequent travellers. These headphones actively scrub out noise, rather than passively blocking it out. Microphones are used to monitor ambient noise, an inverse wave of which is then piped-out by the headphone, negating the din. Great for blocking out plane engine sounds, or just the office air conditioning.
Transducer technologies employed much less commonly for headphones include the Heil Air Motion Transformer (AMT); Piezoelectric film; Ribbon planar magnetic; Magnetostriction and Plasma-ionisation. The first Heil AMT headphone was marketed by ESS Laboratories and was essentially an ESS AMT tweeter from one of the company's speakers being driven at full range. Since the turn of the century, only Precide of Switzerland have manufactured an AMT headphone. Piezoelectric film headphones were first developed by Pioneer, their two models used a flat sheet of film that limited the maximum volume of air movement. Currently, TakeT produces a piezoelectric film headphone shaped similarly to an AMT transducer but, which like the Precide driver, has a variation in the size of transducer folds over the diaphragm. It additionally incorporates a two way design by its inclusion of a dedicated tweeter/supertweeter panel. The folded shape of a diaphragm allows a transducer with a larger surface area to fit within smaller space constraints. This increases the total volume of air that can be moved on each excursion of the transducer given that radiating area.
The thermoacoustic effect generates sound from the audio frequency Joule heating of the conductor, an effect that is not magnetic and does not vibrate the speaker. In 2013 a carbon nanotube thin-yarn earphone based on the thermoacoustic mechanism was demonstrated by a research group in Tsinghua University.[22] The as-produced CNT thin yarn earphone has a working element called CNT thin yarn thermoacoustic chip. Such a chip is composed of a layer of CNT thin yarn array supported by the silicon wafer, and periodic grooves with certain depth are made on the wafer by micro-fabrication methods to suppress the heat leakage from the CNT yarn to the substrate.[citation needed]
If you're a music lover, chances are you're not happy with your phone or media player's bundled earphones. Most of the time, they sound pretty dismal. Some devices don't come with any earphones at all, but even the models that do include them tend not to offer a high-quality listening experience. Your music and video can definitely benefit from an upgrade.
The Bose Soundsport Free are wirefree earbuds (also known as true wireless earbuds). At 1.5 inches deep and 1.25 inches wide, these do stick out of yours ears a little bit, but they sound so good that you might not care. The soft silicone rubber fins rest just outside of your ear canal, so they don't make your ears hurt, and let in just enough ambient noise to warn you when a cyclist or angry dog is approaching. Their sleek clamshell case holds enough power for two full recharges. If you can overlook a barely perceptible lag while watching videos on your phone (and high price tag), these might be the best workout headphones for you.
Earphones might not be as eye-catching as headphones, but they can be much more convenient. Besides their size and weight, earphones are often more resilient than headphones when dealing with moisture. This is important if you want to listen to music at the gym. Earpads can get soaked and worn with a solid sweat, and they aren't built to withstand the regular, constant friction that comes with working out. Earphones can be built to be water- and sweat-resistant, and hold up much better to activity.
Wired headphones are attached to an audio source by a cable. The most common connectors are 6.35 mm (¼″) and 3.5 mm phone connectors. The larger 6.35 mm connector is more common on fixed location home or professional equipment. The 3.5 mm connector remains the most widely used connector for portable application today. Adapters are available for converting between 6.35 mm and 3.5 mm devices.
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