Bone-conducting headphones - Bone conduction headphones send sound through the bones of the skull as opposed to through the ear canal. Most use transducers to send the vibrations through your cheekbones to your cochlea so your eardrums are free to take in sound from your surroundings. This type of headphone is used by many hearing-impaired people to hear the world around them and to listen to music.

Luckily, earbuds usually come with a few different options so you can mix and match until you get the perfect fit, but one thing I’ve learned in my experience is just to invest in a good set of comply memory foam tips for yourself. Not only are they super comfortable and keep the ‘buds in your ears, they also do a solid job of blocking outside noise. This is of course not possible with true in-ears like the Etymotic ER4SR, but those also don’t have this problem because of how far into your ears they sit.

Our favorite workout headphones got better with the 2018 update to the Plantronics BackBeat Fit. You can now connect the headphones to the PLT BackBeat app and choose each function for the sleek, stylish metallic earpieces. A full seven hours of battery life means that you won't be tapping out midway through a long run. Plantronics' "Always Aware" feature lets you hear ambient noise so you don't get run over, and a bigger driver means bigger sound. They're also extremely durable and waterproof. I also tested the Backbeat FIT 3100, but I prefer the ease (and price) of the connected headphones.
Telephone headsets connect to a fixed-line telephone system. A telephone headset functions by replacing the handset of a telephone. Headsets for standard corded telephones are fitted with a standard 4P4C commonly called an RJ-9 connector. Headsets are also available with 2.5 mm jack sockets for many DECT phones and other applications. Cordless bluetooth headsets are available, and often used with mobile telephones. Headsets are widely used for telephone-intensive jobs, in particular by call centre workers. They are also used by anyone wishing to hold telephone conversations with both hands free.
Hearing risk from headphones' use also applies to workers who must wear electronic or communication headsets as part of their daily job (i.e., pilots, call center and dispatch operators, sound engineers, firefighters, etc.) and hearing damage depends on the exposure time. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends sound exposure not exceed 85 dB(A) over 8 hour work day as a time-weighted average.[35] NIOSH uses the 3-dB exchange rate often referred to as "time-intensity tradeoff" which means if sound exposure level is increased by 3 decibels, the duration of exposure should be cut in half. NIOSH published several documents targeted at protecting the hearing of workers who must wear communication headsets such as call center operators,[36] firefighters,[37] and musicians and sound engineers.[38]

Circumaural headphones (sometimes called full size headphones or over-ear headphones) have circular or ellipsoid earpads that encompass the ears. Because these headphones completely surround the ear, circumaural headphones can be designed to fully seal against the head to attenuate external noise. Because of their size, circumaural headphones can be heavy and there are some sets that weigh over 500 grams (1 lb). Ergonomic headband and earpad design is required to reduce discomfort resulting from weight. These are commonly used by drummers in recording.
Today they are typically used only in in-ear headphones and hearing aids, where their high efficiency and diminutive size is a major advantage.[20] They generally are limited at the extremes of the hearing spectrum (e.g. below 20 Hz and above 16 kHz) and require a better seal than other types of drivers to deliver their full potential. Higher-end models may employ multiple armature drivers, dividing the frequency ranges between them using a passive crossover network. A few combine an armature driver with a small moving-coil driver for increased bass output.
At first glance, the Elite 75t, which was originally supposed to cost $200 but now sells for $180 (£170 and AU$299), seems more like an evolutionary upgrade from the highly rated Elite 65t. But the updates turn out to be a little more substantial than I first thought. The Elite 75t's smaller size (the buds and case are 20% smaller than the Elite 65t's), its boosted battery life and USB-C charging are significant upgrades. And then there are the smaller changes, like the new charging case design with magnets inside it that make it easier to open and close and to keep the buds inside. While the Elite 75t isn't quite as comfortable to wear as the AirPods Pro and doesn't have active noise canceling, it does sound better, with clearer overall sound and better bass definition, so long as you get a tight seal.
A balanced armature is a sound transducer design primarily intended to increase the electrical efficiency of the element by eliminating the stress on the diaphragm characteristic of many other magnetic transducer systems. As shown schematically in the first diagram, it consists of a moving magnetic armature that is pivoted so it can move in the field of the permanent magnet. When precisely centered in the magnetic field there is no net force on the armature, hence the term 'balanced.' As illustrated in the second diagram, when there is electric current through the coil, it magnetizes the armature one way or the other, causing it to rotate slightly one way or the other about the pivot thus moving the diaphragm to make sound.

The Powerbeats Pro are an impressive pair of fully wireless buds, but there is one serious drawback we need to point out. The Powerbeats Pro suffered connectivity issues throughout our tests, especially in high-traffic areas or with a phone p;aced in a back pocket. We regularly experienced dropouts while wearing these while running, and the issue repeated across multiple test units and even when using different phones. Your mileage may vary, and hopefully the connection kinks will be worked out on later iterations, but we’d be remiss not to mention the issue.

I was pleasantly surprised by what headphone company Status is able to offer for the money. The BT Structure are its wired sport headphones—IPX5 rated to protect against sweat, with a comfortable over-ear clip. They also have a dual-driver system, which is unusual for sporty headphones in this price range. Most sports headphones tend to emphasize the bass, but the BT Structure sounded very balanced and expansive—the highs of "This Is What You Came For" sparkled against the heavy bass beats. The 10+ hours of battery life is pretty spectacular, too.
Phiaton's Bolt BT 700 are great workout buds. Their wing tips fit more securely in my ear than any other wirefree bud that I've tried. They have clear sound, a strong Bluetooth 5 connection, and a decent battery life of about 5 hours. I also liked controlling them with the on-bud buttons. The real draw is that the case becomes a Bluetooth speaker. If you're in the middle of a podcast when you finish your run, just pop them into the case and press the Bluetooth button on the side. It's not very loud, but it's a nifty feature.

Audiophiles generally agree that if you’re passionate about music, and you have a listening space that is relatively free of outside sounds, nothing beats a really good set of open-back headphones. As far as we’re concerned, you won’t find a set of open-back headphones that manage to combine superb sound quality and a reasonable price than the Sennheiser HD6XX/HD650. To be clear, these are not exactly the same models. The HD6XX is a run of the HD650 with a lower price from Massdrop, and a few physical changes, but when it comes to their audio chops, they’re identical.
Headphones are available with high or low impedance (typically measured at 1 kHz). Low-impedance headphones are in the range 16 to 32 ohms and high-impedance headphones are about 100-600 ohms. As the impedance of a pair of headphones increases, more voltage (at a given current) is required to drive it, and the loudness of the headphones for a given voltage decreases. In recent years, impedance of newer headphones has generally decreased to accommodate lower voltages available on battery powered CMOS-based portable electronics. This has resulted in headphones that can be more efficiently driven by battery-powered electronics. Consequently, newer amplifiers are based on designs with relatively low output impedance.

In-ear headphones are like earbuds but are an upgrade to them. These headphones fit into the wearer's ear canal and stay in place with the use of foam or rubber tips. These tips are available in custom sizes so they can fit each individual wearer. When a proper fit's achieved, in-ear headphones reduce outside noise and deliver sound quality at about the same level as over-ear and on-ear headphones.
×