AGPTEKAKGAPPLE BEATSAT&TAWAccessoryAblegridAcuvarAffluxAltec LansingAnkerAppleAudio-TechnicaAudiospiceBakeeyBeats by Dr. DreBlackBerryBlackwebBoseBudBagCobyCopperDciEEEkitELEGIANTEarphones PlusEcko Unltd.EdifierFREEDOMTECHFisherFonusGOOPROGoogleGraphics and MoreHCOHT4-EarPhoneMHTCIndigiInstenIxirJBLJLab AudioJVCJVC-HEADPHONESJabraJaybirdKIPIERKOGNOLEKognoleKole ImportsKossLINEARFLUXMEElectronicsMaxellMizcoMonopriceMonsterMotorolaMpowMyNetDealsNewOMNIHILOakesOdeMobilePanasonicPattenPhilipsPhotivePixnorPlantronicsPrime BrandsREIKOREYTIDRedcolourfulReikoRippersRockvilleSEGMARTSOUND PLUSSamsungSennheiserSentryShureSkullcandySonyStrategic PrintingSymphonizedTSVTuscomURHOMEPROUnique BargainsWOOZIKWoozikXendaYURBUDSYurbudsiFrogziHipiLuvonn.zdstore
Sensitivity is a measure of how effectively an earpiece converts an incoming electrical signal into an audible sound. It thus indicates how loud the headphones are for a given electrical drive level. It can be measured in decibels of sound pressure level per milliwatt (dB (SPL)/mW) or decibels of sound pressure level per volt (dB (SPL) / V).[12] Unfortunately, both definitions are widely used, often interchangeably. As the output voltage (but not power) of a headphone amplifier is essentially constant for most common headphones, dB/mW is often more useful if converted into dB/V using Ohm's law:
Earphones can connect to your smartphone through a 3.5mm cable or wirelessly over Bluetooth, depending on the model. Wired earphones are generally less expensive, and you don't need to worry about keeping them charged. Bluetooth earphones are more convenient because you don't have to physically connect them to your smartphone, but they need battery power to work. For the most part, you won't find a 3.5mm port and removable cable on Bluetooth earphones; when they're out of power, they're out of commission until you charge them again.
Sensitivity is a measure of how effectively an earpiece converts an incoming electrical signal into an audible sound. It thus indicates how loud the headphones are for a given electrical drive level. It can be measured in decibels of sound pressure level per milliwatt (dB (SPL)/mW) or decibels of sound pressure level per volt (dB (SPL) / V).[12] Unfortunately, both definitions are widely used, often interchangeably. As the output voltage (but not power) of a headphone amplifier is essentially constant for most common headphones, dB/mW is often more useful if converted into dB/V using Ohm's law:
Sony’s Waterproof Walkman is an all-in-one device that doesn’t need to be connected to a phone or other playback source; instead, it has 4GB of storage to hold your music, and you can load up songs and playlists on your PC via the included USB cable just like in ages past. Sure, 4GB might not sound like much space, but that adds up to about 1,000 to 2,000 tracks, depending on their file size. All playback is controlled with tiny buttons on the sides of each earbud. Speaking of charge, the W-Series Walkman will last up to 12 hours per charge, and Sony claims you’ll be able to charge them in no time via their quick-charge feature.
Audiophiles generally agree that if you’re passionate about music, and you have a listening space that is relatively free of outside sounds, nothing beats a really good set of open-back headphones. As far as we’re concerned, you won’t find a set of open-back headphones that manage to combine superb sound quality and a reasonable price than the Sennheiser HD6XX/HD650. To be clear, these are not exactly the same models. The HD6XX is a run of the HD650 with a lower price from Massdrop, and a few physical changes, but when it comes to their audio chops, they’re identical.
Although some headphones available are wired, many more are available that are wireless, and use Bluetooth to enable your music to be heard, even if the stereo or other device is several feet or even a few rooms away. Wired headphones deliver superior sound quality to wireless and Bluetooth because there's no chance of picking up interference from other devices, which sometimes happens with wireless headphones. In addition, wired headphones have no batteries to power them, so there's no chance of interruption should the batteries wear out.
×