Every single Bluetooth codec has significant quality issues—despite many creative solutions employed to make the most of the limited bandwidth the standards employ. For those keeping score at home: not a single codec available can meet wired signal quality. Though Bluetooth audio has come a long way since its noisy beginnings, it’s still not ready to replace the headphone jack. Qualcomm’s aptx HD, and Sony’s LDAC 990kbps codecs come close, but everything else falls far short of the mark.
Dale: There are so many types of amplifiers (and DAC’s with amplifiers) that there is no shortcut for studying all of the options, unless you settle for the most generic approach. Important things to consider are power – if you don’t have enough power for your headphone and the dynamics in the music, clipping will result. Sometimes the clipping is “soft” and not readily noticed, but eventually you would discover that much of the detail goes missing or gets veiled with limited dynamics. Another consideration is whether to use a DAC, which may be a separate DAC or built into the same enclosure as the amp. Most DACs will improve the sound over the DACs that are built into computers, but when a DAC is available to replace the DAC built into most cellphones and low to mid-priced music players, you can usually expect a much greater improvement.
That amp, if in good working condition, has 100 times the potential sound quality that those 2 headphones can play. You could improve the sound somewhat with a careful EQ, since the Marantz will have power reserve to spare. But I’d try to find a better headphone, and there are some bargains out there. If I were suggesting an ortho, I’d say get the lower price Mad Dog, which will give you great audiophile sound with the Marantz.
Although some headphones available are wired, many more are available that are wireless, and use Bluetooth to enable your music to be heard, even if the stereo or other device is several feet or even a few rooms away. Wired headphones deliver superior sound quality to wireless and Bluetooth because there's no chance of picking up interference from other devices, which sometimes happens with wireless headphones. In addition, wired headphones have no batteries to power them, so there's no chance of interruption should the batteries wear out.
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